Ask me a question!

Please feel free to ask me a question here or at my email addy: reddirtramblings@gmail.com. I’ll try to answer every question and get back to you as quickly as possible.

 

About 

I’m a writer, born and raised in Oklahoma, and an obsessive gardener who grows shrubs, perennials and vegetables on my acreage each year. My favorite veggies have to be homegrown hybrid or heirloom tomatoes, Genovese basil and hot and mild peppers. It’s an Italian salsa garden at my house.


10 thoughts on “Ask me a question!

    • Well, I nearly live in Zone 6 in my garden too. Sometimes, it feels like Zone 5 in fact. So, I would plant kale, chard, lettuce, spinach, beets, turnips, bok choy, etc. So many good things. Plant on!

  1. Any thoughts on controlling ants? I bought some diatomaceous earth and will spread it tomorrow. I don’t want to use pesticides. Help! They are making themselves at home especially in my pathways.
    Andie

    • Hi Andie, I’ve never had much trouble with ants in the garden, and they’re frankly needed to open peony blossoms so I put up with some of them. However, I’ve always read that cornmeal (especially if paired with borax) and placed near the entrance of their nest will kill them. My understanding is that the cornmeal swells in their stomachs. I think that boric acid will help kill them. I hope this information helps. Thanks for joining our little gardening club.

      • Thanks for your response. I’ll look into those suggestions. That’s interesting about ants opening peony blossoms. I’ve never grown peonies here in So Calif. They sure grow beautifully in my parents’ hometown in Nebraska. Whenever I see them I think of summer days on the farm. Such a fun treat it was for me to visit Nebraska family on the farm, as I grew up in the city. Here dealing with ants is a constant struggle but this is the first year they have invaded the garden. Thanks for the tips!
        Andie

  2. One thing that confuses me on the back of seed packets is the spacing issue. I do not have a big garden plot and if I followed the directions (which I’m not prone to do) I wouldn’t have room for anything. For example . . . .seed spacing 2 – 3 inches, row spacing 4 – 6 feet. Is that literal? If I have a row 4 feet long, I should sow 1 or 2 seeds every 2-3 inches? I always have leftover seed too. How is a good way to keep it for the next year?

    • Hi Mitzi, you can often space things a bit closer than listed on the seed packets, but you also might consider a different vegetable or growing vegetables vertically instead of letting them sprawl. Summer squash, melons and pole green beans can all be grown vertically and save space. For leftover seed, you can freeze it or keep it in a dry area. Freezing it though will keep it fresher longer. Look online for websites on storing seed, and you’ll see so many of them.~~Dee

  3. Hello Miss Dee! First, I am a DEFINITE novice gardener, and you inspired me to grow ROSES!!! I planted several Belinda’s Dream roses in my yard in Norman, and they have truly grown like weeds!
    Second, I would like to start a pollinator (in a bed on the south side of my home that is NOW filled with grass) garden, focusing mostly on beautifully scented plants that do well in central OK. Do you have any favorites? I am overwhelmed with suggestions, and I know OK is a unique climate!
    Thank you so much for your inspiration and for helping me to succeed!!!

    • Hi Jennifer! So, you want scented plants? If you want a pollinator garden, you need to plan for babies pollinators and adults. Although not heavily scented, zinnias are a great nectar plant for any garden. I just bought some seeds myself. Also, all the old favorites like cosmos, heliotrope (very fragrant), roses, Phlox paniculata. Head over to my Red Dirt Ramblings blog, reddirtramblings.com and search for pollinators. You’ll find lots of ideas I think. Plant milkweed for baby Monarchs and dill for baby Swallowtails. Also, there are lots of native trees and shrubs you can add later. Good luck!

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